When planes resume flying, this is what you should be prepared for.

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We may have to wait for some more time, before we pack our bags and look forward to flying again, but in the meanwhile let’s have a look at how different it will be flying in a post pandemic world.

There are going to be massive changes that will need to be put in motion by multiple stake holders, airlines, and governments around the world to get air travel up and running.

The MOCA (Ministry of Civil Aviation, India ) is considering drafting of a new standard operating procedure to be followed by the airlines and airports across the country.

A multi level course of action will be emphasised by everyone concerned.

Aviation post covid

 

Some of the points are as follows

Leaving for the airport:-

Most flyers will have to install the Aarogya App on their smart phones as a requirement to travel.

No cabin baggage will be permitted as yet.

Reach airport at least 3 hours before flight time.

Web check in or self check in only will be permitted in the initial days.

Protective gears like masks, gloves, will be mandatory for all passengers.

 At the terminal:-

Passengers who show signs of fever or any symptoms on their Aarogya app will not be allowed to enter the terminal.

Thermal screening of all passengers will be mandatory at the embarkation and disembarkation points.

All passengers will do a self check in and have a contactless check in.

All payments for tickets will have to be made digitally.

No cabin baggage will be allowed, except for laptop / ladies purse.

Limit weight and no of pieces of checked baggage.

Passenger will self check in and drop baggage as per the airlines guidelines.

 Security gates:-

Social distancing will have to be followed as per govt guidelines.

Pat down checks will have to be minimised.

Trays will be sanitised after each check.

Sanitizers will have to be kept for use of passengers before and after security.

Bio-metrics will have to be enhanced at each airport.

 Boarding:-

Self scanning of e boarding passes at gates.

Boarding to commence an hour before departure.

Gates to close 20 mins before the departure time.

Boarding to be done in batches of 10 passengers.

No cabin baggage will be allowed.

In-flight:-

Thermal screening of all embarking passengers by crew is mandatory.

Sanitised aircrafts, including tray tables, seat arm rests, mandatory after each flight.

Passengers to wear mask at all times within the aircraft.

Crew to avoid any non essential contact with passenger.

Avoid or minimise use of Lavatory.

No meal/ water service allowed.

Suspension of all on-board sales.

Last three rows kept vacant for isolation –just in case.

Arrival :-

Stagger passenger movement while disembarking.

Allow passengers to disembark from front according to rows.

Thermal screening of all passengers at disembarkation.

Baggage:-

Disinfection of all baggage at before placing at the carousel.

Staggered placement of baggage on the carousel.

SPICEJETAIRCRAFT

With such unprecedented times, not only the airline and airport crew, but also each passenger will have to take the initiative to make sure all safety protocol is followed to stop the spreading of the virus, and embrace the new normal.

Let’s make our land as well our skies safe to fly again.

-Madhavi

Go local

incredible india

According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), the travel and tourism sector accounts for approximately 10 percent of total jobs and almost 10% GDP globally. That’s an estimated 8.8 trillion U.S. dollars annually.

On April 3, WTTC said in a release that 75 million travel tourism jobs are at risk globally due to COVID-19 pandemic.

The common takeaway within the Indian travel fraternity right now is to focus single-mindedly on promoting domestic tourism immediately. It is imperative that governments and tourism bodies put their focus exclusively on regenerating Domestic Tourism and Aviation, as it is one of the first levers of recovery for the local economy: restaurants, hotels, attractions, etc, they all depend on local travel until foreign travelers return.

After months of isolation and self-induced coma, as cities end their lock downs, people will be allowed to start roaming the streets again.

They will become more interested than ever in discovering their own city as well as the local/ domestic area.

And as when planes start flying again, most travellers will essentially be looking for travelling within the country and taking short ‘ feel good ’ trips rather than going on long haul international trips.

Most travellers would be vary of taking and exploring cities with walking tours, with a group of strangers in a foreign country, due to some restrictions that might still be in place. For instance, traveling abroad might be limited due to safety issues.

As such, local/domestic travel will remain the only viable option for travel, with most travelers interested in quick getaway trips, with a focus on wellness and sustainable tourism.

When travel starts to recover, it will begin with flights and accommodation at the forefront, so naturally the expectation of the people will be to become more interested in budget tours, price-sensitive activities and better value for money and budget-friendly activities post-crisis.

The focal point will be specifically on short vacations, boutique or quieter hotels with fewer rooms and smaller groups or individual solo trips.

India’s strength has been its diversity of tourism potential with mountains, hills, beaches, backwaters, jungles, forests, flora, heritage, spirituality, pilgrimage, wellness, sheer relaxation, arts and crafts, cuisines, and cultures.

However, what we need to understand is that the old world order no longer exists. It’s kaput.

We need to have a new vision board for the future. Minimalistic design with a deep rooted but conscious approach keeping hygiene as the top priority will be the new bespoke for hotels, restaurants and airlines.

Curated, custom and tailor made vacation with mindful travelling along with an affordable cost will be the new norm.

-Madhavi

 

 

 

The COMEBACK PLAN

How the INDIAN TOURISM & HOSPITALITY Industry will open its doors post Covid-19

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The pandemic has crushed the global economy and shut down the tourism industry. Everything is falling like a ton of bricks. It’s like a torpedo has just hit the ship. It may take months or maybe even seasons to come back and stand on its feet if data is anything to go by.

While the entire tourism industry which includes Airlines, Hotels, Airports and all its partners are sending out their prayers and thoughts to the millions of people across the globe who have unfortunately suffered the wrath of the Virus, they are also gearing up and committing to making a difference in whatever way they can. Whether it is evacuating people from wherever they are stranded, to chartering flights in providing essential supplies and being an important link in the supply chain or even opening their doors to the community at large by providing food and shelter anywhere required.

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HOTELS are working hard in preparation of reopening their doors post the lockdown, ensuring that the facilities are safe, clean and ready, making sure that patrons feel secure in the areas of cleanliness, hygiene and social distancing so that when they walk through the doors they know the hotels commitment to their health and safety is of paramount importance and a priority.

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Deep cleaning and sanitization procedures will be carried out according to the new stricter norms. Rooms may have minimalistic approach and amenities could include sanitizers and wipes.

Most hotels have already started virtual trainings for the teams on the new standards, be it the airport assistance, front of the house, in-room delivery, laundry or the kitchen and have come up with new seating plans for the meeting spaces, restaurants and staff cafeteria.

AirbnbRelief

AIRBNB distinguished itself with an inventory of mostly short-term rentals. It offered the hosts a steady income to cover up their mortgage payments etc and offered would-be travelers who couldn’t afford fancy hotels, a chance to rent a room or a home in a cool glitzy neighborhood for maybe half of the cost of a hotel stay.

What would have been a roaring public listing announcement this year has now flown out of the window so to speak. And even if things start limping back to ‘normalcy’ by the end of the year let’s not forget the underlying issue here: how will AIRBNB find customers willing to stay in other people’s homes after all this?

Unfortunately, no one knows how long the crisis will last or how it will change consumers’ behavior. As the world puts on surgical masks and latex gloves, the corporate sterility of a Sheraton or a Hyatt suddenly seems a lot more appealing than somebody else’s bed. So has the AIRBNB’s moment ended? Only time will tell.

airline 2

With unprecedented consequences, many AIRLINES have grounded all, or almost all of the planes in their fleet. Several airlines are now flying passenger aircraft as freighters. Unless the government provides a stimulus to the cash strapped airlines, the year 2020 will see a lot more airlines staying grounded rather than up there at 35000 feet flirting with the skies.

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An action-oriented, and digitally supported “flight plan” is imperative for airlines to emerge stronger from the COVID-19 crisis. One of countless air-travel challenges will be on getting passengers off their plane and through passport control, baggage reclaim and arrivals without putting them in close proximity to each other.

Airlines will have to accelerate consumer confidence about the safety in flying again, making sure to enhancing the need for sanitization of the aircraft after each route.

Assigning the necessary space for people on flights won’t be any easier. Armrests, tray tables and seat-belt buckles will have to be disinfected after every journey; and in-flight magazines and all other reading material have been removed.

Of course the ground turnaround time will have to be re planned for all LCCs – for whom timing was of paramount importance in pre Covid-19 days.

Airlines will have to begin imposing specific limitations for passengers, including requirements before boarding and have stringent security measures put in place at  boarding , such as mandatory health screenings or certificates, carrying personal water bottles, wearing masks and gloves at all times during the duration of the flight, and limit or refrain from carrying cabin baggage .

airlines

Post COVID-19 AIRPORTS will have the gigantic task of maintaining social distancing through-out the terminal buildings inside as well as at the approach. What they will also need to work on is managing a contactless passenger process to avoid the risk of infection. E boarding cards, self -Check-in kiosk and Bag Tag printing, Self Service Bag Drop facility, Biometrics, will have to be implemented at airports across the country.

Each airport will be responsible to sanitize, maintain the hygiene and cleanliness of the passenger processing equipment units used at the airport, including boarding pass printing kiosks, bag tag printers, digital payment modes, card machines and scanners, security zones, trays to scan cabin bags, laptops etc.

airport

Sanitizers will have to be placed at all the locations that involve touching of the equipment before and after the process zone.

In the days and weeks following September 11 of 2001, the world changed. We all just felt it in our bones that nothing would ever be the same again. There was a pre-9/11 world and we are now looking at a post COVID-19 world.

Staff of food delivery companies sit on social distancing chairs due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as they wait for their costumers' orders at a department store in Bangkok

While the 2008 financial crisis changed the economy, 9/11 changed us; it bought out our worst fears into the open. It created a shift in thinking and our sense of self. It changed how we viewed the world. There was a “lost innocence.” And as the Coronavirus has rapidly unfolded in the past few months, we feel that way again, on a massive global scale.

From how we work, travel, and conduct our day-to-day lives, everything is going to be different. We can see that a change is coming.

Let’s hope this change is a positive one. And this change of a ‘new normal ‘offers us a clean slate to decide on and create a better and brighter future for each one of us and for all of humanity.

 

-Madhavi

 

How COVID-19 will change the way you travel

covid travel 1

COVID -19 is like the monster that engulfed the entire world in its pandemic circle too fast. Most countries did not have time to even prepare for the basics, leave aside eventualities.

Besides targeting people’s health this pandemic has also devastated businesses around the globe leading to unprecedented job losses, closures of establishments and doom as far as economy goes – worst since the Great Depression of 1930s.

Every component of the Travel and Tourism industry, including air, rail,  ground transport  and hotels & restaurants are the most severely hit sectors globally, as the outbreak continues to take its toll.

What is now important is to try to plan ahead of the curve , to re-imagine and re-shape the new reality of travel.

covid travel 3

Social distancing – the new norm?

After this contagion has been contained, international travel may not be a top priority for the majority of the global population, partly out of fear (until a vaccine is found), and partly due to the collapse of the economy.

Airlines and airports will have to work together in tandem to bring back customer confidence, and to support a new way of travelling defined by social distancing and increased sanitization.

Although compulsory, this could be particularly challenging for smaller airports which tend to have large crowds of people due to relatively small spaces.

Managing large queues in typically congested areas such as check-in halls and security/immigration checkpoints poses an additional challenge.

Queue management will have to be enforced strictly which could ‘up your time taken door to door’ with longer pre check in times and longer wait at security and immigration.

Of course technology will have to take a leap forward and enable airports and airlines overcome the hurdles of this new reality; besides a lot of self discipline amongst travellers.

covid 4

Automation will become paramount

All elements of the industry will have to make swift progress to re-imagine, re-shape and re-invent travel.

A range of contactless, self-service technologies to screen the vital signs of passengers, and baggage drops will have to be implemented by majority of airports. And for this the demand for automation, robotics and biometrics, will only become stronger.

The implementation of biometric E-gates may somewhat cut queuing times in the future but getting a number of airports e-enabled could be a mammoth task as of now.

With a lot of people unlikely to be wanting to touch surfaces and interact with agents as little as possible, automating as many passenger processes as possible will be crucial.

Maybe scanners on the lines of CCTV and surveillance platforms could be adapted to spot passengers who are indicating potential illness symptoms.

And of course carrying a certificate of immunity along with other travel documents will become mandatory.

To take things really out of hand, so to speak, passengers may turn to using their own devices at every touch point – right from checking in and navigating through the terminal, to controlling In flight entertainment  creating a real opportunity for airlines to promote relevant ancillary services though their mobile apps.

covid travel 2

Reconsider flight schedules

Most airlines especially those who have quick turnarounds between flights will have to look at rescheduling their time table to ensure thorough sanitizing of the aircraft while on the ground/in transit.

Cabin decontamination will have to be given centre stage to reassure passengers and crew that the cabins are sanitized and healthy.

However, reduced turnaround time has always been a weapon for airlines to cut costs, and also to keep airports profitable, so this would certainly pose a big challenge to the industry.

Also in the immediate future airlines will also have to consider using “social distancing” within the aircraft. The “seat separating” approach in which every second seat in the aircraft would have to be left unoccupied.

This would present another financial blow to airlines. But looking at a different point of view here, giving passengers a vacant space could also provide a sort of “a new premium travel experience” since passengers are guaranteed of having an empty seat next to them.

Although this could have a positive passenger experience so to speak, will the airlines charge more in such case? …. and more importantly will the passengers be willing to pay more.

If industry veterans are to be believed it will take a year to 18 months to reach anywhere near pre-crisis traffic levels, and the industry may not record pre-COVID-19 traffic volumes again before the end of 2021.

But at the same time, it is important to remember that while this crisis has put immediate growth ambitions on hold; all stakeholders should use the real opportunity for meaningful innovation and transformation to be accelerated.

Ultimately, airports and airlines must take action now to help secure consumer confidence and ensure they are well placed when the demand for air travel inevitably returns; and also be future-ready!

ny9

 

 

-Madhavi

 

 

OS:FTE
OP: AirlineTrends;TravelDaily; GoogleNews

Stay strong

Sharing below the Remarks of Alexandre de Juniac,Director General and CEO at the IATA Media Briefing on COVID-19, 7 April 2020, on the devastating crisis the entire aviation industry is facing globally.

 

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Date: 7 April 2020

Remarks of Alexandre de Juniac at the IATA Media Briefing on COVID-19, 7 April 2020

 

The impact of COVID-19 on the air transport industry continues to be devastating. The industry is burning through cash at a dangerous rate. Some $61 billion could disappear from cash reserves in the second quarter alone. Demand is in free-fall. Worldwide it’s down 70% compared to last year—90% in Europe. And it could even get worse.

There are no words that can adequately describe how deeply this crisis is impacting aviation.

If aviation is not functioning, the economic damage goes well beyond the sector itself. Some 65. 5million jobs are linked to aviation. If the planes don’t fly, the viability of many of these jobs disappears.

Many businesses have been ordered to close or cease operations—airlines, restaurants, tourist attractions, and hotels among them. And if global supply chains are broken, still others in manufacturing or retail will not have anything to make or sell.

Governments acting on the guidance of health authorities will determine when the lockdowns and travel restrictions can safely end. When that decision is taken, the air transport sector needs to be ready to deliver the people and goods that are required for many businesses to start operating normally again.

Our estimation is that some 25 million people’s jobs are at risk until the aviation sector is functioning again. 25 million people is equal to the entire population of Australia.  It is equal to the entire labor force of Italy and larger than the workforce of major industrialized nations like Spain or Canada. The scale of the economic impact is enormous.

From this, I want to emphasize two conclusions.

The first you have already heard me speak about. Governments need to urgently provide financial relief to the airlines. That is to ensure that they can survive as viable businesses that can lead the recovery when we get to that stage. We continue to ask governments for:

  • Direct financial support;
  • Loans, loan guarantees and support for the corporate bond market by the Government or Central Banks, and
  • Tax relief

We received some positive news today from Eurocontrol which has deferred the payment of more than EUR1.1 billion to help airlines maintain liquidity.

Throwing airlines lifelines like this at this critical stage will help people far beyond those directly employed in air transport. That is one of the reasons why we believe that governments must make the viability of airlines a priority.

Some governments are responding. But we are concerned that relief is not sufficiently available. Speed is of the essence. On average airlines have two months of cash on hand. And many airlines are already into the third week of major shutdowns of their businesses.

The second conclusion is that we cannot leave the recovery of the sector to chance. We must have firm and coordinated plans in place so that airlines can re-start operations when governments and public health authorities give us the all clear. And we need to be able to scale-up operations as demand returns.

One challenge will be the physical re-start. If airlines have been largely shut down for a few months, restarting is a complicated thing. All the licensed personnel need to be ready to go. But their licenses may have expired or the airline’s safety audit dates may have passed. Airworthiness certificates may no longer be valid. Schedules may need to be coordinated. Aircraft will need some maintenance work.

We have never shut down the industry on a global scale before. So this will be the first time for a re-opening.

The second challenge is adapting the industry to post-COVID-19 realities. Having gone through the pain of shutting down economies to fight the virus, governments will not accept the risk of reinfection. We see this in the severe measures that China has introduced to limit international flights. It is more restrictive now than it was at the height of the COVID-19 crisis in China.

We are not expecting to re-start the same industry that we closed a few weeks ago. Airlines will still connect the world. And we will do that using a variety of business models. But the industry processes will need to adapt.

So another stream of activity will involve working with governments and health authorities to understand what measures will be needed.

A particular focus will be on travel restrictions. States implemented these on a unilateral basis—closing their borders to others. We should aim to have a more managed and predictable approach to how these restrictions are revised to enable governments to re-open their borders.

Part of this will surely involve passenger screening. And we don’t want to repeat the mistakes made after 9.11 when many new processes were imposed in an uncoordinated way. We ended up with a mess of measure piled on top of measure. And nearly twenty years later we are still trying to sort it out.

In this case, we have some, if limited, time to build consensus around how to do this most effectively. Of course, we will need to work with public health authorities to understand their needs and guidance on any necessary screening measures.

At the end of the SARS crisis, temperature screening was a key factor in returning the sector to normal. We need to find the equivalent process to take us to when a COVID-19 vaccine is available. The goal we should have is an effective set of standard practices that can be implemented globally as required.

A further area of activity is on stimulating markets. With questions over so many things that we take for granted, we have the ability to re-think processes or systems to make them better when the industry starts up again.

And, by better I mean more efficient and less costly.

A good example could be visas. If we can get governments to use e-visa technology we could reduce costs and improve efficiency. Making the process easier without compromising on security would pay immediate benefits when people return to travel.

The 25 million people whose jobs are at risk as a result of this crisis will depend on an efficient re-start of the industry. IATA will be concentrating its efforts to resolve these issues with governments and other stakeholders.

One initial step is a series of virtual meetings—or summits—to which we will invite governments and other stakeholders. The recovery will, for sure, need a strong and coordinated team effort. Among the main objectives of the summits two things are critical:

  • Understanding what is needed to re-open closed borders
  • Agreeing solutions that can be operationalized and scaled efficiently

The plan is to do this regionally, building towards a global outcome. I don’t have specific dates to share yet. But we are targeting to start towards the end of April.

Lastly, today is World Health Day. I will close with a salute to the healthcare workers who are working so courageously to fight this pandemic.

I am happy to take your questions.

 

Teleconference recording

Listen to the teleconference recording (mp3)

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Lets hope and pray the situation improves soon globally and in the meanwhile all of you stay strong.

rgds
Madhavi

 

OS: IATA

Use Technology to your advantage…Take a virtual tour

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The last few days have been excruciatingly difficult for each one of us. With the entire world in a state of lock down and restricted movements, with governments telling us to stay at home and to only go outside for food, health reasons , and maintain social distancing, the one thing we shouldn’t neglect to do is look after our mental health .

Since many of our regular social activities are no longer available to us, let us look at things from a broader perspective.

Let’s follow a different rhythm of life, a chance to be in touch with others in different ways than usual.

Let’s be in touch with other people regularly on social media, e-mail or on the phone.

Create new daily routines that prioritise looking after yourself.  Read, watch movies, try new relaxation techniques, or finding new knowledge on the internet.

With all travel ceasing, a good way to indulge in your wanderlust is to make full use of technology and take a virtual trip to anywhere you like, without spending a dime and leaving your room.

If you’re seeking a bit of adventure, check out Google Maps’ virtual treks.

You can hop from climbing El Capitan in Yosemite to journeying around Petra in Jordan to braving the icy terrain and looking for polar bears in Churchill, Manitoba in just a matter of minutes.

So go ahead and enjoy this virtual vacation.

The only remaining question: Will you watch from your bed or your couch?

 

Stay safe.

Madhavi

 

 

 

 

 

Travel Plans gone bust?Take a virtual tour of these top UK tourist attractions.

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A worldwide lockdown doesn’t have to bring back the fear of missing out on your dream  holiday you had planned months back.

Why not make the most of your stay -at- home time and enjoying your day as best as possible?

From Buckingham Palace to the Lake District National Park: Take a virtual tour to these top UK tourist attractions from the comfort of your own home – thanks to amazing interactive virtual tours and webcams.

Featured below are UK’s top online tours for royal residences, museums and galleries, national parks and more thanks to the incredible webcams and virtual tours on their websites.

 

The National Gallery

The National Gallery, in collaboration with Google Street View, has an online tour of its fascinating paintings across seven of its rooms and its central hall.

According to the gallery, those logging on can look at ‘Renaissance masterpieces from Northern Italy, the Netherlands, and Germany, including works by Titian, Veronese, and Holbein’.

To take an online tour, visit www.nationalgallery.org.uk/visiting/virtual-tours.

 

The Beatles Abbey Road 360

An incredible interactive panoramic image by britishtours.com allows you to explore the instantly recognisable graffitied sign and zebra crossing outside London’s Abbey Road Studios – made famous by The Beatles.

By zooming around, you can see the leafy streets of North London and a family trying to recreate the famous Abbey Road album cover.

To check out the image, visit www.britishtours.com/360/beatles-abbey-road.

 

Victoria & Albert Museum

London’s V&A Museum doesn’t offer an interactive virtual tour, but you can browse static images of some of the stunning artefacts that it has showcased via its website.

The museum says: ‘From ancient Chinese ceramics to Alexander McQueen evening dresses, take an incredible journey through 5,000 years of human creativity with our online collections.’

To peruse the V&A collections, visit https://www.vam.ac.uk/collections?type=featured.

 

The Royal Academy of Arts’ online drawing class

If you want to brush up on your art skills, The Royal Academy of Arts’ website has an online life drawing tutorial.

The anatomy class was originally broadcast in February 2019 and features a male model as well as a miniature horse.

To have a go at the class, visit www.royalacademy.org.uk/article/watch-life-drawing-live-anatomy-class. And have some paper and a pencil to hand.

 

Tate Britain

The works on display at the Tate Britain can be explored thanks to the gallery’s collaboration with Google Street View.

There are also more than 270 items in its collection that can be viewed on the site.

To meander past the Tate Britain’s works, visit artsandculture.google.com/partner/tate-britain.

 

Edinburgh Zoo

Edinburgh Zoo might be off-limits for now, but you can still keep an eye on the antics of some of the animals there thanks to a series of live webcams.

The cams have been placed in the enclosures of the pandas, penguins, tigers and koalas. Don’t worry if you can’t see the animals at first – they may just be lurking out of shot.

To keep up to date with the creatures, log on to www.edinburghzoo.org.uk/webcams.

 

British Museum

The British Museum’s collection spans over two million years of human history – and it can be explored online.

Thanks to Google Street View, history buffs can view artefacts including the Rosetta Stone, the Parthenon sculptures and Egyptian mummies.

To step inside a digital version of the museum visit artsandculture.google.com/partner/the-british-museum.

 

Hidcote Manor Gardens

Located in the Gloucestershire village of Hidcote Bartrim, Hidcote Manor Gardens is a series of outdoor spaces brimming with colourful plants and flowers.

And thanks to a bloomin’ marvellous 360-degree interactive feature on the National Trust website, you can wander amongst them from the comfort of your own lockdown HQ. Turn on the sound effects to hear birds chirping.

To gaze upon the wonders of nature visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/hidcote/features/hidcote-virtual-tours.

 

Lake District National Park

The stunning Lake District National Park has a series of webcams placed at its most beautiful sights.

By logging on, you can see live scenes from Windermere, Conniston Water, Derwentwater, Ullswater, Keswick and Skiddaw.

To check them out, visit www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/visiting/webcams-videos-and-photos/webcams.

 

Sissinghurst Castle

Sissinghurst Castle, in Kent, has a stunning array of gardens and is best known for its blooms of white roses in the summer.

And on the National Trust website, keen gardeners can explore both the rose garden and courtyard as well as the library in the castle’s stable.

To see more, visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sissinghurst-castle-garden/features/sissinghurst-castle-virtual-tours.

 

Anglesey Abbey

Anglesey Abbey is a Jacobean-style house with gardens and a working mill in Cambridgeshire.

Online, you can take a tour of the original dining room, formal garden and tapestry hall.

To start exploring, visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/anglesey-abbey-gardens-and-lode-mill/features/anglesey-abbey-virtual-tours.

 

Hyde Park and Kensington Palace Gardens

Two of London’s most famous parks, Hyde Park and Kensington Palace Gardens, can be explored via Google Street View.

You can tour Hyde Park’s education centre as well as meander around its footpaths and see Kensington Palace, the official home of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

To get exploring, visit www.royalparks.org.uk/learn/learn-in-hyde-park-and-kensington-gardens/planning-your-visit/our-facilities/virtual-tour.

 

A la Ronde

A La Ronde is an 18th-century, 16-sided house located in Lympstone, Devon, that is owned by the National Trust.

Online there is a virtual tour of its ornate shell gallery and cosy drawing room as well as a panoramic view across the River Exe from its gantry.

To take a peek, visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/a-la-ronde/features/a-la-ronde-virtual-tours.

 

Giant’s Causeway

The rugged landscape of the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland is a sight to behold – in real life and online.

On the National Trust website you can take a virtual tour of the landmark from four different angles – the Grand Causeway, Aird Snout, Giant’s Port and Port Noffer.

To check it out, visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/giants-causeway/features/take-a-virtual-tour-of-the-giants-causeway and remember it comes complete with the sounds of crashing waves and birds.

 

Buckingham Palace

Royal fans can venture inside Buckingham Palace and explore three of the rooms – from their own home.

They can discover the Throne Room, the White Drawing Room and the Grand Staircase. Users can click on the icons to learn more about the rooms and the objects in them.

To catch a sneak peek, visit www.royal.uk/virtual-tours-buckingham-palace.

 

Palace of Holyroodhouse

It’s not just the Queen’s official residence you can tour virtually.

You can also discover three of the rooms at her official Scottish home, the Palace of Holyroodhouse. The rooms you can explore are the Grand Stair, the Morning Drawing Room and the Royal Dining Room.

To see the rooms, visit www.royal.uk/virtual-tours-palace-holyroodhouse.

 

Houses of Parliament

No area of the Houses of Parliament is off-limits in this 360-degree virtual tour.

Online you can discover parts of the grand, historic building, including the Central Lobby, the Peers’ Corridor, the Robing Room, the Royal Gallery and both the House of Commons and House of Lords.

To step inside, visit www.parliament.uk/visiting/virtualtour/.

 

Royal Pavilion, Brighton

Brighton’s Royal Pavilion has a virtual tour of four of its rooms, with each providing a 360-degree angle.

Not only will those logging on get to see inside the banqueting room, great kitchen, music room and the usually off-limits red drawing room, you can also listen to an audio guide.

To find out more, visit brightonmuseums.org.uk/royalpavilion/whattosee/virtual-tour/.

 

Canterbury Cathedral

There are several areas of Canterbury Cathedral that the public can enjoy online.

These are the crypt, the quire, the nave and Trinity Chapel.

To start a tour, visit www.canterbury-cathedral.org/visit/information/tour/.

 

RAF Museum

The RAF Museum in London has virtual tours of several of its collections and exhibitions.

These include the Grahame White Watch Office, the historic hangars and Bomber Hall.

To fly in, log on to www.rafmuseum.org.uk/london/things-to-see-and-do/virtual-tours.aspx.

 

Natural History Museum

The Natural History Museum has a collaboration with Google Street View so naturalists can explore the venue from home.

Large parts of the museum can be discovered, although some of the exhibits in the pictures may have changed since the tour was generated.

To virtually visit the museum, visit artsandculture.google.com/partner/natural-history-museum.

 

Stonehenge

Bring the mysteries of Stonehenge in Wiltshire onto your computer screen thanks to the English Heritage website 360-degree tour.

It puts you inside the monument – with clickable white circles revealing more about the unfathomable structure.

To explore, visit www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history-and-stories/stonehenge360/.

 

 

Stay home-stay Safe. This too shall pass.

-Madhavi

 

 

 

OS-DailyMail.co.uk