Look beyond the horizon

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Since the Covid-19 pandemic hit, travel has grounded to a complete halt. Critical client meetings have been moved to Zoom, frequent-flier cards have gathered dust and we communicate with colleagues, friends and family around the world without jumping on a plane.

Uncertain is a buzzword making its way into most conversations at the moment, on travel specifically or when speaking about the future in general.

According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, in 2019, travel and tourism’s direct, indirect and induced impact accounts for 10.3 percent of the global GDP and 330 million jobs around the world (that is 1 in 10 jobs).

The damage done by the pandemic is yet to be completely accounted for and not only in terms of revenue lost, but also from the loss of jobs and more importantly livelihood, for the multitude of people working in the travel, tourism and hospitality industries. The crisis has left the industry at rock bottom. With many airlines going under, it seems likely that many of those jobs aren’t coming back anytime soon — if ever.

Prior to the pandemic, with the economy on solid ground, investment in the travel industry boomed. Now, this massive engine of growth has been thrown into reverse as Covid-19 continues to ping-pong around the globe.

But alas that was the economy we once knew.

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We’re all struggling to understand how quickly travel will recover in terms of the magnitude of the impact the pandemic has caused. Recovery from past events like 9/11 or the global financial crisis generally took two to three years, but even then these events did not entail the months-long shutdown of virtually all of global travel.

And health concerns also were not an issue in either of the events. And that makes it even harder to predict how soon fliers may feel comfortable exposing themselves to strangers once again, or fellow passengers not wearing masks and a general discomfort around flying. The scars inflicted on travel and tourism look to be permanent as most tourism related companies shift away from massive travel budgets and experiential living becomes a memory.

The former strength of the travel and leisure sector was a convergence of demographic and economic factors such as lifestyle changes among the middle class who had been bitten by the ‘flying bug’ and were eager to see the world beyond the local tourism segments, availability of resources to spend freely on leisure and business travel, and millennial and solo travellers who lived to taste the bigger chunk of travel related experiences.

This massive pullback in both business and leisure travel is apt to inflict the deepest economic pain on both the airline as well as the hospitality sectors. According to IATA the industry is unlikely to come back on its feet as it were to pre-covid days, until the 2024 or even later, provided the vaccine is available soon.

All over the globe with countries most dependant on tourism such as Mexico, Spain, Italy, China and Australia, are struggling to find an answer to the crises as cases show a resurgence of a second wave.

And that is the case of just the developed world, many emerging markets that are highly dependent on travel and tourism will be devastated if the pandemic continues to spread over time.

Travel is a massive services export for many countries. As the recession caused by the pandemic becomes apparent, the task to rebuild and renew the travel and hospitality industry once again will be a long and ongoing process for years to come.

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So how does the future of travel look like? 

Well travelling will make a come-back again, that’s for sure. But it will be a privilege with people making considered choices about not only how and where they travel but also why they want to travel.

After being cooped up for so long, travellers will more responsible and conscientious as they seek out serene holiday spots, which will give them peace, simplicity and a desire to reconnect with nature.

People are likely to take fewer holidays, with the journey and experience being just as important as the destination.

The travel corridors which have recently been created by many countries are a great first step in rebooting the travel industry. In the immediate future, both staycations and trips which offer greater connection with local communities, and supporting travel brands that prioritize and implement environmentally sustainable tourism will lead the way.

Of course the truly deciding factor will be safety – moving forward travellers will want clear and transparent communication from the tourism councils, government, destinations, tour operators and other travel providers reassuring them that it is safe to travel.

The situation that we are currently experiencing is universal. And although is a time none of us ever wanted to see in our lifetime, what makes me hopeful is that this situation has somehow generated the opportunity for people to feel united again. This challenging period made people more sensitive and connected to each other, more concerned about their health and well-being, keener to find their real selves, and also to look for balance and meaning in their lives.

It was also a chance for nature to take a break and breathe, as well as to remind us of the importance of living in simplicity and purity.

As Ancient Greeks used to say, “All in good measure.”

-Madhavi

 

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OS- Bloomberg Opinion;BBC News;Forbes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jet ….set….GO

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Up in the air- that’s where they are supposed to be….yes I am talking about planes here.  All those lean mean flying machines that have been grounded due to this disastrous pandemic.

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a UN specialized agency, that manages the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Chicago Convention) in support of a safe, efficient, secure, economically sustainable and environmentally responsible civil aviation sector.

The ICAO Council has adopted a new task force produced by the Council’s Aviation Recovery Task Force (CART) and is aimed at restarting the international air transport system and aligning its global recovery, post COVID 19 .

The ICAO along with CART has resolved to partner with its Member States, international and regional organizations, and industry to address the various challenges and to provide global guidance for a safe, secure and sustainable restart and recovery of the aviation sector, keeping the health, safety, and security of the travelling public of paramount concern.

This restart and recovery is best supported by an international approach and is based on 10 key principles:

  1. Protect people: harmonized but flexible measures;
  2. Work as one aviation team and show solidarity;
  3. Ensure essential connectivity;
  4. Actively manage safety-, security- and health-related risks;
  5. Make aviation public health measures work with aviation safety and security systems;
  6. Strengthen public confidence;
  7. Distinguish restart from recovery;
  8. Support financial relief strategies to help the aviation industry;
  9. Ensure sustainability;
  10. Learn lessons to improve resilience.

Globally- and regionally-harmonized, mutually-accepted measures are essential. The success of aviation’s recovery  and to reinforce the aviation ecosystem today and in the future will be best achieved with collective efforts among stakeholders across regions and sectors, with rigorous follow-up to the recommendations and measures outlined in the report across all levels, local, national and international.

The world needs aviation and aviation today is in great need of a thrust that will enable planes to be airborne once again. Solidarity among all countries and regions and industry sectors will be extremely critical going forward. Restoring public confidence in air travel is not only imperative but it has some broad benefits too.

It is not only about the operational and economic viability of the aviation sector that is important here. But also of having the faith , the economic livelihoods and the stability of the massive number of people working at the frontline and the back offices in this industry, restored.

For more detailed report check out the ICAO page here

 

Happy flying again

Madhavi

 

 

 

OS:ICAO

 

 

 

It’s been a long time, hasn’t it?

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A long time since you packed your bags and set off on that much needed holiday.

A long time, since you were excited to see that landmark and click pictures near it.

A long time since you planned and wanted to take that road trip with your friends.

A long time, since you met your family and friends living across the shores.

A long time since you exchanged hugs and kisses and had some amazing meals with them.

A long time, since those early morning wake up calls, to watch the sunrise or have a swim with the dolphins.

A long time since you walked the unfamiliar streets of a new destination and caught the eye of a stranger.

A long time, since you had a stroll in the green spaces of a different city.

A long time, since you were stopped in your tracks  by an entertainer in the middle of a piazza.

A long time, since you skipped lunch to gorge on a variety of ice creams and frozen gelatos

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Days, weeks and months flew by. Hasn’t it?

Oh how I am craving to do all this real soon.

My heart is longing to travel the world again.

I am so eager to stand in the queue of the immigration again.

To wait in line for boarding a flight.

For sleeping through a long haul flight.

For smelling the clean pristine air of a different country.

To eat at new places , to sightsee , to shop, so much more to do yet …….

The good life is calling out to me.

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And I am very sure that we all will be able to soon fly out of our nests to roam the world like free birds.

SOON !!

Keeping a very very positive mindset here !!!!!

-Madhavi

 

 

 

When planes resume flying, this is what you should be prepared for.

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We may have to wait for some more time, before we pack our bags and look forward to flying again, but in the meanwhile let’s have a look at how different it will be flying in a post pandemic world.

There are going to be massive changes that will need to be put in motion by multiple stake holders, airlines, and governments around the world to get air travel up and running.

The MOCA (Ministry of Civil Aviation, India ) is considering drafting of a new standard operating procedure to be followed by the airlines and airports across the country.

A multi level course of action will be emphasised by everyone concerned.

Aviation post covid

 

Some of the points are as follows

Leaving for the airport:-

Most flyers will have to install the Aarogya App on their smart phones as a requirement to travel.

No cabin baggage will be permitted as yet.

Reach airport at least 3 hours before flight time.

Web check in or self check in only will be permitted in the initial days.

Protective gears like masks, gloves, will be mandatory for all passengers.

 At the terminal:-

Passengers who show signs of fever or any symptoms on their Aarogya app will not be allowed to enter the terminal.

Thermal screening of all passengers will be mandatory at the embarkation and disembarkation points.

All passengers will do a self check in and have a contactless check in.

All payments for tickets will have to be made digitally.

No cabin baggage will be allowed, except for laptop / ladies purse.

Limit weight and no of pieces of checked baggage.

Passenger will self check in and drop baggage as per the airlines guidelines.

 Security gates:-

Social distancing will have to be followed as per govt guidelines.

Pat down checks will have to be minimised.

Trays will be sanitised after each check.

Sanitizers will have to be kept for use of passengers before and after security.

Bio-metrics will have to be enhanced at each airport.

 Boarding:-

Self scanning of e boarding passes at gates.

Boarding to commence an hour before departure.

Gates to close 20 mins before the departure time.

Boarding to be done in batches of 10 passengers.

No cabin baggage will be allowed.

In-flight:-

Thermal screening of all embarking passengers by crew is mandatory.

Sanitised aircrafts, including tray tables, seat arm rests, mandatory after each flight.

Passengers to wear mask at all times within the aircraft.

Crew to avoid any non essential contact with passenger.

Avoid or minimise use of Lavatory.

No meal/ water service allowed.

Suspension of all on-board sales.

Last three rows kept vacant for isolation –just in case.

Arrival :-

Stagger passenger movement while disembarking.

Allow passengers to disembark from front according to rows.

Thermal screening of all passengers at disembarkation.

Baggage:-

Disinfection of all baggage at before placing at the carousel.

Staggered placement of baggage on the carousel.

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With such unprecedented times, not only the airline and airport crew, but also each passenger will have to take the initiative to make sure all safety protocol is followed to stop the spreading of the virus, and embrace the new normal.

Let’s make our land as well our skies safe to fly again.

-Madhavi

Go local

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According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), the travel and tourism sector accounts for approximately 10 percent of total jobs and almost 10% GDP globally. That’s an estimated 8.8 trillion U.S. dollars annually.

On April 3, WTTC said in a release that 75 million travel tourism jobs are at risk globally due to COVID-19 pandemic.

The common takeaway within the Indian travel fraternity right now is to focus single-mindedly on promoting domestic tourism immediately. It is imperative that governments and tourism bodies put their focus exclusively on regenerating Domestic Tourism and Aviation, as it is one of the first levers of recovery for the local economy: restaurants, hotels, attractions, etc, they all depend on local travel until foreign travelers return.

After months of isolation and self-induced coma, as cities end their lock downs, people will be allowed to start roaming the streets again.

They will become more interested than ever in discovering their own city as well as the local/ domestic area.

And as when planes start flying again, most travellers will essentially be looking for travelling within the country and taking short ‘ feel good ’ trips rather than going on long haul international trips.

Most travellers would be vary of taking and exploring cities with walking tours, with a group of strangers in a foreign country, due to some restrictions that might still be in place. For instance, traveling abroad might be limited due to safety issues.

As such, local/domestic travel will remain the only viable option for travel, with most travelers interested in quick getaway trips, with a focus on wellness and sustainable tourism.

When travel starts to recover, it will begin with flights and accommodation at the forefront, so naturally the expectation of the people will be to become more interested in budget tours, price-sensitive activities and better value for money and budget-friendly activities post-crisis.

The focal point will be specifically on short vacations, boutique or quieter hotels with fewer rooms and smaller groups or individual solo trips.

India’s strength has been its diversity of tourism potential with mountains, hills, beaches, backwaters, jungles, forests, flora, heritage, spirituality, pilgrimage, wellness, sheer relaxation, arts and crafts, cuisines, and cultures.

However, what we need to understand is that the old world order no longer exists. It’s kaput.

We need to have a new vision board for the future. Minimalistic design with a deep rooted but conscious approach keeping hygiene as the top priority will be the new bespoke for hotels, restaurants and airlines.

Curated, custom and tailor made vacation with mindful travelling along with an affordable cost will be the new norm.

-Madhavi

 

 

 

The COMEBACK PLAN

How the INDIAN TOURISM & HOSPITALITY Industry will open its doors post Covid-19

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The pandemic has crushed the global economy and shut down the tourism industry. Everything is falling like a ton of bricks. It’s like a torpedo has just hit the ship. It may take months or maybe even seasons to come back and stand on its feet if data is anything to go by.

While the entire tourism industry which includes Airlines, Hotels, Airports and all its partners are sending out their prayers and thoughts to the millions of people across the globe who have unfortunately suffered the wrath of the Virus, they are also gearing up and committing to making a difference in whatever way they can. Whether it is evacuating people from wherever they are stranded, to chartering flights in providing essential supplies and being an important link in the supply chain or even opening their doors to the community at large by providing food and shelter anywhere required.

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HOTELS are working hard in preparation of reopening their doors post the lockdown, ensuring that the facilities are safe, clean and ready, making sure that patrons feel secure in the areas of cleanliness, hygiene and social distancing so that when they walk through the doors they know the hotels commitment to their health and safety is of paramount importance and a priority.

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Deep cleaning and sanitization procedures will be carried out according to the new stricter norms. Rooms may have minimalistic approach and amenities could include sanitizers and wipes.

Most hotels have already started virtual trainings for the teams on the new standards, be it the airport assistance, front of the house, in-room delivery, laundry or the kitchen and have come up with new seating plans for the meeting spaces, restaurants and staff cafeteria.

AirbnbRelief

AIRBNB distinguished itself with an inventory of mostly short-term rentals. It offered the hosts a steady income to cover up their mortgage payments etc and offered would-be travelers who couldn’t afford fancy hotels, a chance to rent a room or a home in a cool glitzy neighborhood for maybe half of the cost of a hotel stay.

What would have been a roaring public listing announcement this year has now flown out of the window so to speak. And even if things start limping back to ‘normalcy’ by the end of the year let’s not forget the underlying issue here: how will AIRBNB find customers willing to stay in other people’s homes after all this?

Unfortunately, no one knows how long the crisis will last or how it will change consumers’ behavior. As the world puts on surgical masks and latex gloves, the corporate sterility of a Sheraton or a Hyatt suddenly seems a lot more appealing than somebody else’s bed. So has the AIRBNB’s moment ended? Only time will tell.

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With unprecedented consequences, many AIRLINES have grounded all, or almost all of the planes in their fleet. Several airlines are now flying passenger aircraft as freighters. Unless the government provides a stimulus to the cash strapped airlines, the year 2020 will see a lot more airlines staying grounded rather than up there at 35000 feet flirting with the skies.

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An action-oriented, and digitally supported “flight plan” is imperative for airlines to emerge stronger from the COVID-19 crisis. One of countless air-travel challenges will be on getting passengers off their plane and through passport control, baggage reclaim and arrivals without putting them in close proximity to each other.

Airlines will have to accelerate consumer confidence about the safety in flying again, making sure to enhancing the need for sanitization of the aircraft after each route.

Assigning the necessary space for people on flights won’t be any easier. Armrests, tray tables and seat-belt buckles will have to be disinfected after every journey; and in-flight magazines and all other reading material have been removed.

Of course the ground turnaround time will have to be re planned for all LCCs – for whom timing was of paramount importance in pre Covid-19 days.

Airlines will have to begin imposing specific limitations for passengers, including requirements before boarding and have stringent security measures put in place at  boarding , such as mandatory health screenings or certificates, carrying personal water bottles, wearing masks and gloves at all times during the duration of the flight, and limit or refrain from carrying cabin baggage .

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Post COVID-19 AIRPORTS will have the gigantic task of maintaining social distancing through-out the terminal buildings inside as well as at the approach. What they will also need to work on is managing a contactless passenger process to avoid the risk of infection. E boarding cards, self -Check-in kiosk and Bag Tag printing, Self Service Bag Drop facility, Biometrics, will have to be implemented at airports across the country.

Each airport will be responsible to sanitize, maintain the hygiene and cleanliness of the passenger processing equipment units used at the airport, including boarding pass printing kiosks, bag tag printers, digital payment modes, card machines and scanners, security zones, trays to scan cabin bags, laptops etc.

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Sanitizers will have to be placed at all the locations that involve touching of the equipment before and after the process zone.

In the days and weeks following September 11 of 2001, the world changed. We all just felt it in our bones that nothing would ever be the same again. There was a pre-9/11 world and we are now looking at a post COVID-19 world.

Staff of food delivery companies sit on social distancing chairs due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as they wait for their costumers' orders at a department store in Bangkok

While the 2008 financial crisis changed the economy, 9/11 changed us; it bought out our worst fears into the open. It created a shift in thinking and our sense of self. It changed how we viewed the world. There was a “lost innocence.” And as the Coronavirus has rapidly unfolded in the past few months, we feel that way again, on a massive global scale.

From how we work, travel, and conduct our day-to-day lives, everything is going to be different. We can see that a change is coming.

Let’s hope this change is a positive one. And this change of a ‘new normal ‘offers us a clean slate to decide on and create a better and brighter future for each one of us and for all of humanity.

 

-Madhavi

 

How COVID-19 will change the way you travel

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COVID -19 is like the monster that engulfed the entire world in its pandemic circle too fast. Most countries did not have time to even prepare for the basics, leave aside eventualities.

Besides targeting people’s health this pandemic has also devastated businesses around the globe leading to unprecedented job losses, closures of establishments and doom as far as economy goes – worst since the Great Depression of 1930s.

Every component of the Travel and Tourism industry, including air, rail,  ground transport  and hotels & restaurants are the most severely hit sectors globally, as the outbreak continues to take its toll.

What is now important is to try to plan ahead of the curve , to re-imagine and re-shape the new reality of travel.

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Social distancing – the new norm?

After this contagion has been contained, international travel may not be a top priority for the majority of the global population, partly out of fear (until a vaccine is found), and partly due to the collapse of the economy.

Airlines and airports will have to work together in tandem to bring back customer confidence, and to support a new way of travelling defined by social distancing and increased sanitization.

Although compulsory, this could be particularly challenging for smaller airports which tend to have large crowds of people due to relatively small spaces.

Managing large queues in typically congested areas such as check-in halls and security/immigration checkpoints poses an additional challenge.

Queue management will have to be enforced strictly which could ‘up your time taken door to door’ with longer pre check in times and longer wait at security and immigration.

Of course technology will have to take a leap forward and enable airports and airlines overcome the hurdles of this new reality; besides a lot of self discipline amongst travellers.

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Automation will become paramount

All elements of the industry will have to make swift progress to re-imagine, re-shape and re-invent travel.

A range of contactless, self-service technologies to screen the vital signs of passengers, and baggage drops will have to be implemented by majority of airports. And for this the demand for automation, robotics and biometrics, will only become stronger.

The implementation of biometric E-gates may somewhat cut queuing times in the future but getting a number of airports e-enabled could be a mammoth task as of now.

With a lot of people unlikely to be wanting to touch surfaces and interact with agents as little as possible, automating as many passenger processes as possible will be crucial.

Maybe scanners on the lines of CCTV and surveillance platforms could be adapted to spot passengers who are indicating potential illness symptoms.

And of course carrying a certificate of immunity along with other travel documents will become mandatory.

To take things really out of hand, so to speak, passengers may turn to using their own devices at every touch point – right from checking in and navigating through the terminal, to controlling In flight entertainment  creating a real opportunity for airlines to promote relevant ancillary services though their mobile apps.

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Reconsider flight schedules

Most airlines especially those who have quick turnarounds between flights will have to look at rescheduling their time table to ensure thorough sanitizing of the aircraft while on the ground/in transit.

Cabin decontamination will have to be given centre stage to reassure passengers and crew that the cabins are sanitized and healthy.

However, reduced turnaround time has always been a weapon for airlines to cut costs, and also to keep airports profitable, so this would certainly pose a big challenge to the industry.

Also in the immediate future airlines will also have to consider using “social distancing” within the aircraft. The “seat separating” approach in which every second seat in the aircraft would have to be left unoccupied.

This would present another financial blow to airlines. But looking at a different point of view here, giving passengers a vacant space could also provide a sort of “a new premium travel experience” since passengers are guaranteed of having an empty seat next to them.

Although this could have a positive passenger experience so to speak, will the airlines charge more in such case? …. and more importantly will the passengers be willing to pay more.

If industry veterans are to be believed it will take a year to 18 months to reach anywhere near pre-crisis traffic levels, and the industry may not record pre-COVID-19 traffic volumes again before the end of 2021.

But at the same time, it is important to remember that while this crisis has put immediate growth ambitions on hold; all stakeholders should use the real opportunity for meaningful innovation and transformation to be accelerated.

Ultimately, airports and airlines must take action now to help secure consumer confidence and ensure they are well placed when the demand for air travel inevitably returns; and also be future-ready!

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-Madhavi

 

 

OS:FTE
OP: AirlineTrends;TravelDaily; GoogleNews

Passenger Experience Initiatives

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Operating in a volatile environment, airlines today are influenced by a variety of external factors that impact their business – either on the ground or in the air.

Extreme weather conditions, natural disasters, mechanical problems, labour issues, air traffic congestion, security alerts and other disruptions can not only damage an airline’s brand value but also generate unexpected costs, not to mention the fact that it puts tremendous pressure on the airports and the ground staff to accommodate passengers on next flights.

To deal with such delays, airlines as well as to an extent airports need the agility to restore normal services swiftly and cost-efficiently.

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Airports, both large and small, are noisy, crowded and stressful. As global air traffic continues to grow—the International Air Traffic Association estimates the current volume will double by 2035—and airports everywhere will be feeling the impact.

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Crowded terminals and runways, longer queues and wait times and increased number of frustrated passengers seems like an impending doom for the travel business.

Airport operators who cannot expand their infrastructures due to environmental issues, space restrictions or a lack of capital must find new approaches to be more efficient and responsive to passenger needs.

Technology and access to accurate data can greatly improve an airport’s operational efficiency to improve passenger experience, which is the need of the hour with millions of travellers taking to air.

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International hubs such as Dubai, Changi and Helsinki are concentrating on how to deliver high quality experience to travellers using their services.

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Massive airport expansions and an emphasis on creating Zen-like atmospheres, or designing more open spaces and adding  facilities is fine but to deliver the best possible passenger experience involves synchronizing with multiple operators by getting ahead of issues, before they become disruptions.

A Total Airport Management approach is needed by using real-time data to detect, and even predict, passenger needs hours in advance, and deal with emerging situations before they become problems.

A holistic view of the passenger, that begins even before they leave their homes. Weather, road and rail conditions can impact their arrival times at the airport, while flight delays can change the departure times and could impact their onward journey. Knowing these factors beforehand and understanding passenger volume and activity helps airports optimize wait times and better coordinate the passenger experience.

Retail partners better anticipate foot traffic and revenues.

Using data on meteorological conditions, flight prioritization, runway traffic loads, aircraft turn-around times, and baggage and passenger operations mean reduced delays, unnecessary fuel burn, and cost savings for airlines.

Outside data sources, such as weather and traffic information, can be pulled in to support decision making (e.g. by anticipating flight delays due to rain, fog or likely storms airports can call in more staff to handle the unforeseen delays).

What passengers want from air travel is to get to their destinations on time with minimal inconvenience and stress.

To provide this experience for growing volumes of passengers, airports must forecast capacity demand years, seasons, months, weeks, days in advance, to be as prepared as possible.

Information regarding estimated wait times for security screenings, customs processing and baggage arrival should be used on airport displays to provide airport maps and show passengers how to get to where they need to go without unnecessary delay.

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As air travel increases, airports that lack the funding and/or space to expand their facilities must find ways to minimize disruptions and deliver exceptional service to passengers and airlines alike by adopting technology-driven capabilities that provide greater end-to-end visibility and planning across landside and airside operations.

When your customers only travel every now and then, their airport experience is a big deal. Your infrequent air travellers are often vacationers, and their experience forms an integral part of their overall vacation experience, setting the mood for the entire trip.

-M

 

 

 

 

PC- Dsilymail;happyornot.com;internationalairportreview
OS: – www.internationalairportreview.com

Check your Visa before you board your flight

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Recently on our travels, while we were standing in the queue to board our flight from Amsterdam to New Delhi, there was a passenger ahead of us who wasn’t allowed to board the flight as due to an issue with his E-visa.

Apparently he hadn’t received a confirmation/approval of him being issued an E-visa  and was refrained from boarding.

Not to be confused with Visa on Arrival, E-visa must have an approval electronically, which is later stamped on the passport on arrival.

The Government of India, has now extended its e-visa facility which is an electronic authorization to travel to India for citizens of 165 countries at the 25 international airports and 5 seaports.

Check the country eligibility here-

https://indianvisaonline.gov.in/evisa/tvoa.html

The Indian e-Visa is issued for single double or multiple entries for visits with a duration of stay up to 90 days from date of first entry for tourist purposes, and up to 180 days for business purposes. Canada, Japan, UK and USA nationals are allowed stays of up to 180 days for tourist visits.

A traditional visa is obtained through an application process where the traveler must submit their original passport along with application materials in order for the visa to be approved. It is stamped inside the passport. While the process itself takes longer and requires more paperwork, the visa that is issued has a longer validity and allows multiple entries.

Eligible citizens traveling for leisure/tourism, business, or medical purposes have the option to apply for an Indian visa online, and have their visa granted electronically. The visa will then get stamped in the passport upon arrival in India, at which time biometrics (fingerprints) will also be taken.

No, it is not possible to apply for an Indian visa at the airport after you land.

All visas, including e-Visas, must be applied for before travel. Most airlines will not let you board without a valid visa.

There have been cases in the past where passengers have applied for an evisa and have booked their travel without waiting for an official electronic confirmation of their visa being granted. They have concluded of their application confirmation as a visa confirmed status.

However as I was researching for this I found that the information on the website is lacking in some clarity regarding visa on arrival and evisa directives.

It’s better to cross check the details with the airlines and travel agents, in case of any doubts, before embarking on your journey.

For more information on tourist visa on arrival click here-

https://www.india.gov.in/spotlight/encouraging-inbound-tourism-tourist-visa-arrival-tvoa-scheme#tvoa2

For more information on the Indian E-visa click here-

https://visacentral.com/about-india-e-visa

evisa

-M

Did you Know?

Read below for some Interesting Facts about Airports, Airlines and Air Travelling, that you probably didn’t know.

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  • All International Airline Pilots must speak English. The ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organisation) standard is that English is the only official “universal” language for telephony in civil aviation. This essentially means that all official communications in the Air Traffic Control system should be available in English in order to be considered ICAO Compliant.
  • Flights longer than 8 hours require 3 pilots (1 captain and 2 first officers) to rotate flying duties. Flights longer than 12 hours require 4 pilots (1 captain and 3 first officers). They usually fly 3-4 hour shifts.

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  • Though it’s technically not mandated by the FAA, each airline pilot flying the aircraft, eats a different meal to minimize the risk of all pilots on board being ill.
  • The height requirement for Flight Attendant is for safety reasons, making sure that all flight attendants can reach overhead safety equipment.
  • Dimming the lights for takeoff and landing isn’t a mood effect. It’s done so passengers’ eyes can adjust to the dark, just in case there’s an emergency that shuts off the lights. Similarly, flight attendants have passengers raise their window shades during landing, so they can see outside in an emergency and assess if one side of the plane is better for an evacuation.
  • Keeping the blinds open while take-off and landing is for the passengers to spot any fire in the wings or to spot any vehicles in the tarmac so they could alert the crew.
  • Instruction to fasten the seat belts and to make the seat upright while take-off and landing is primarily for the safety of the passengers. But it also stabilizes the centre of gravity of the aircraft and helps controlling the plane.
  • It’s impossible to lock yourself in the bathroom. Do you ever notice how the flight attendants flip a little switch on the lavatory door before takeoff and landing? That switch locks the door so it won’t fly open and can be flipped on or off at any time.
  • An air traveler can lose approximately 1.5 liters of water in the body during a three-hour flight. That dry air saps the water from your body, to the tune of about 8 ounces an hour, which is roughly a two-litre bottle during a 10-hour long-haul flight. Stay hydrated, friends.
  • You lose out on a third of your taste buds during flights. About a third of your taste buds are numbed at altitude, which is why the savory flavors in tomato juice are enhanced — a big reason why people crave Bloody Marys and think they taste so much better on planes.
  • The safety instructions on most flight include how to use the oxygen masks that are deployed when the plane experiences a sudden loss in cabin pressure. However, one that thing that the flight attendants don’t tell you is that oxygen masks only have about 15-minutes worth of oxygen. That sounds like a frighteningly short amount of time, but in reality that should be more than sufficient. Oxygen masks drop when the airplane cabin loses pressure, which means the plane is also losing altitude. Pilots respond to that situation by moving the plane to an altitude below 10,000 feet, where passengers can simply breathe normally, no extra oxygen required.

masks

  • Ever notice trails left by planes. Those white lines that planes leave in the sky are simply trails of condensation, hence their technical name of “contrails.” Plane engines release water vapor as part of the combustion process. When that hot water vapor is pumped out of the exhaust and hits the cooler air of the upper atmosphere, it creates those puffy white lines in the sky. It’s basically the same reaction as when you see your breath when it’s cold outside.
  • Some airplanes have secret bedrooms for flight crew. On long-haul flights, cabin crew can work 16-hour days. To help combat fatigue, some planes, like the Boeing 777 and 787 Dreamliners, are outfitted with tiny bedrooms where the flight crew can get a little shut-eye. The bedrooms are typically accessed via a hidden staircase that leads up to a small, low-ceilinged room with 6 to 10 beds, a bathroom, and sometimes in-flight entertainment.

crew rest

  • The largest passenger plane was the Airbus 380 – nearly 240 feet long, almost 80 feet high, and has a wingspan of more than 260 feet. The double-decker plane with a standard seating capacity of 555 passengers is being retired after just 12 years in commercial service.  The A380 is expensive for airlines to fuel and maintain. Filling up an upwards of 550 plus seats look impressive on paper, but troublesome from a business perspective. The aviation industry is about “putting butts in seats,” as the saying goes. So if you can’t fill up those seats the airline is in serious trouble.
  • You ever notice that little hole in the bottom of your window? That little hole in the plane window might save your life. That’s the breather hole, and besides keeping in warm air so you don’t get too chilly, it regulates pressure — ensuring that should anything happen to the outer pane of the window, the pressure won’t cause the inner pane to break, at which point you’d suddenly be sucking in oxygen at 35,000 feet.

window

  • Usually, turbulence only drops you a few feet in the air. Though you might feel like you’re on the top floor of Tower of Terror, run-of-the-mill light turbulence only drops the plane a few feet in altitude. Moderate turbulence — the kind pilots tell the flight attendants to sit down for — moves the plane 10-20 feet. Severe, white-knuckle, talk-about-it-for-the-rest-of-your-life turbulence might move a plane 100 feet in the most extreme circumstances.
  • The average Boeing 747 has around 150-175 miles of wiring inside it…and about 6 million parts and is more fuel efficient than a hybrid.
  • Planes can fly with one engine, and land with none Not that the pilot is going to get on the intercom and tell you about it, but commercial jets are designed to fly with only one operable engine. And can glide their way to the ground with no engine power at all. So if your plane breaks down mid-air, you’ll still likely land in one piece!
  • There’s a red light on the left wing and a green light on the right. At night, it’s hard for pilots to see other aircraft. Every plane has a red light on the left wing and green on the right, so other pilots can easily identify which way the plane is facing and what direction it’s going.

lights

  • King Fahd International Airport, Dammam Saudi Arabia tops the list of the 10 largest airports in the world by size. With a total area of 780 square kilometers, the airport’s total area exceeds that of the country of Bahrain! Most of the property, however, is not put into use. In fact, only 37 square kilometers are dedicated for airport usage. That is only about 5%!

fahd

  • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) is the busiest airport in the world.  Retaining the title since 1997, Hartsfield-Jackson remains in the pole position,according to the Airports Council International’s world traffic report, which was released on Sept. 16, 2019. More than 107 million passengers scurried along its lengthy concourses, rode its underground train (the Plane Train) and were lifted up and down its vertigo-inducing escalators, making it the busiest passenger airport in the world for 21 years in a row.
  • Changi Airport Singapore is voted the World’s Best Airport 2019 by international air travellers for the seventh consecutive year.

-jewel-changi-retail

  • KLM -Royal Dutch Airlines is the worlds’ oldest airline which was established in 1919. It recently celebrated 100 years of flying high!

klm

 

-M

PC: BusinessInsider;Wired;TheTelegraph;Airbus;Dailymail